Saltwater Fish:Saltwater Aquarium Sharks and Rays

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Saltwater Aquarium Sharks and Rays

 
   

Sharks and Rays can both be fun additions to an aquarium that is large enough to suit the particular species (minimum size 180 gallons for the smaller or less active species), and that provides the right environment.Most Sharks and Rays are large meat eaters that require large aquariums. Most grow to a minimum of 36 inches and require a minimum 180 gallon aquarium. Many sharks, like the leopard shark, shown above, can grow up to 6.5 ft. long and require a minimum 400 gallon tank. The smallest Sharks and Rays that we have found are: Marbled Cat Shark, Atelomycterus macleayi: 60 cm (24") ; Horned Shark, Heterodontus francisci: 96 cm (38") ; Brownbanded Bamboo Shark, Chiloscyllium punctatum: 100 cm (40") ; California Stingray or Round Stingray, Urobatis halleri, 26 cm (10.") ; Blue Spotted Stingray, Taeniura lymma: 25 cm (10") without the tail.

Sharks are aggressive carnivorous predators that will eat anything that they can swallow whole. Usually though they will not attack healthy, normal acting fish but will be attracted by the smell of blood or raw meat. They will also sense fish that are acting abnormally, like goldfish in saltwater, and try to catch them. Some sharks are constantly moving and searching for food, like the Leopard Shark found on the West Coast of the USA T. semifasciatus, while others, like the Leopard shark found in the Coral Sea, S. fasciatum, lie around waiting for food to come to them. All sharks swim by moving their vertically oriented tail fin from side to side. In contrast, porpoise and dolphin have a horizontally oriented caudal fin which they move up and down. Most sharks are rather large and not well suited to life in captivity.

Rays have a flattened body and are bottom-dwellers. This body shape enables them to better blend into their environment, and to bury themselves in a sandy substrate. In many species, this flattened body enables them to stay afloat with very little effort. Most rays swim by "flapping" their enlarged pectoral fins like wings, and those with a well developed caudal fin swim similar to the shark.

Care and feeding of Sharks and Rays: Should be fed all kinds of meaty foods, live or prepared. Fish, squid, shrimp, occasional live goldfish. Will eat most anything they can swallow in one bite.

Please note: We guarantee that ALL aquaria species we offer will arrive alive and in good condition. However, because of the increased level of care required for sharks, they have been designated as "Advanced Aquarist Only." recommended only for the advanced marine aquarist, zoo, or research institution.

Black Banded Cat Shark
Chiloscyllium punctatum
Banded Cat Shark
Description:They prefer reefs and tide pools and are frequently found sitting in sandy areas on the ocean floor. The Black Banded Cat Shark is called a Cat Shark because of the barbels at the mouth look just like a cat's whiskers. The other name common is the Brown Banded Cat Shark.

Care should be taken when cleaning the display tank and feeding. Like all sharks, this one has the possibility of inflicting a very painful bite, especially when provoked. Sharks tend to act aggressively toward other fish, particularly smaller ones. Be sure to house with larger, aggressive species.
Recommended Tank: The Banded Cat Shark stays on the smaller size for a Shark, but requires at least a 180 gallon or larger aquarium as an adult. It requires a soft sand bottom as the substrate as the belly can easily be scratched by coarser substrate, which may lead to an infection. Like all sharks, it can never be exposed to copper-based medications.
Food and diet:Feed a varied diet consisting of large chunks of meaty foods. These foods include krill, raw table shrimp, squid, clam and mussel.
Reef Compatability:No
Level of Care: Difficult
Acclimation time: 4+ hours
Approximate Purchase Size: Small: up to 6"; Medium: 6" to 8"; Large: 8" to 15"
*Special Note:Because of the increased level of care required for this species it has been marked Advance Aquarist , as an"Advanced Aquarist Species," there is no guarantee provided. 

Small $119.99 Medium $149.99 Large $199.99
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Hand Fed Black Banded Cat Shark
Chiloscyllium punctatum
Hand Fed Banded Cat Shark
Description:These Banded Cat Sharks have been lovingly hatched and raised in our tanks. We hand feed them small pieces of fresh squid, shrimp, and other crustaceans every other day. Because of this, they are more accustomed to human contact than wild-caught Banded Cat Sharks, and they are comfortable with tank life. You can feed yours by hand, as well. Just be sure to cut up the pieces small enough as pieces that are too big may get spat back out. Many of our hand fed Banded Cat Sharks are so comfortable with people that you can pet them. But never forget that they are sharks, and you should still be cautious and alert when handling and caring for them.

They prefer reefs and tide pools and are frequently found sitting in sandy areas on the ocean floor. The Black Banded Cat Shark is called a Cat Shark because of the barbels at the mouth look just like a cat's whiskers. The other name common is the Brown Banded Cat Shark.

Care should be taken when cleaning the display tank and feeding. Like all sharks, this one has the possibility of inflicting a very painful bite, especially when provoked. Sharks tend to act aggressively toward other fish, particularly smaller ones. Be sure to house with larger, aggressive species.
Recommended Tank: The Banded Cat Shark stays on the smaller size for a Shark, but requires at least a 180 gallon or larger aquarium as an adult. It requires a soft sand bottom as the substrate as the belly can easily be scratched by coarser substrate, which may lead to an infection. Like all sharks, it can never be exposed to copper-based medications. .
Food and diet:Feed a varied diet consisting of chunks of meaty foods. These foods include krill, raw table shrimp, squid, clam and mussel.
Reef Compatability:No
Level of Care: Moderate
Acclimation time: 4+ hours
Approximate Purchase Size: Small: up to 6"; Medium: 6" to 8"

Click on link to see hand fed sharks being fed

Small $219.99 Medium $249.99
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 Banded Cat Shark Eggs
Chiloscyllium sp.
Cat Shark Egg

Description: Place your egg somewhere with good water flow, and, in 2 - 8 weeks, you'll see it hatch into a 4 - 5 inch Banded Cat Shark.

While you cannot predict the precise moment of hatching, you can tell that hatching time is near by the size of the yolk sack remaining in the egg. This yolk sack is the nourishment for the embryo, and the shark will emerge once the yolk sack is used up. If your egg hatches prematurely, it is recommended that you quarantine the baby until the yolk sack is used up and falls off. The quarantine will help reduce the risk of the sack breaking.
*Do not expose shark egg to air as there is a risk of air bubbles getting trapped inside and harming the shark.

Newborn Bamboo Cat Shark Info : Place the newborn in a large container such as a plastic deli container that has been perforated with a large number of holes for water flow. The smoothe container is a safe haven for the first few weeks of life.
It may take from a few days to a few weeks to start eating. Offer your baby banded shark small pieces of squid or shrimp to encourage to start eating.

Recommended Tank Setup: Make sure your aquarium has a soft sand bottom without any sharp rocks it may get scratched on. Provide medium water flow as they prefer it.
Important Aquacon Tips:Please remember the tips we are providing are important factoids in getting Newborn sharks to feed. Baby sharks will try to split up their food pieces or will resist eating all together, so your assistance is essential to its survival. Please do not attempt to hatch the egg yourself unless the yoke has been completely consumed. The shark will do it on its own when it's ready. If the yoke is completely consumed carefully open the egg with a very sharp razor blade carefully to not harm the contents.

Acclimation time: 4+ hours *Do not expose egg to air as there is a risk of air bubbles getting trapped inside.

Approximate Purchase Size: 2-3/4" to 4"

*Special Note:Because of the increased level of care required for this species it has been marked Advance Aquarist , as an"Advanced Aquarist Species," there is no guarantee provided. 


$49.99
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Marbled Bamboo Cat Shark
Chiloscyllium plagiosum
Marbled Bamboo Cat Shark
Description:They prefer reefs and tide pools and are frequently found sitting in sandy areas on the ocean floor. The Marbled Banded Cat Shark is called a Cat Shark because of the barbels at the mouth look just like a cat's whiskers.

Care should be taken when cleaning the display tank and feeding. Like all sharks, this one has the possibility of inflicting a very painful bite, especially when provoked. Sharks tend to act aggressively toward other fish, particularly smaller ones. Be sure to house with larger, aggressive species.
Recommended Tank: The Marbled Banded Cat Shark stays on the smaller size for a Shark, but requires at least a 180 gallon or larger aquarium as an adult. It requires a soft sand bottom as the substrate as the belly can easily be scratched by coarser substrate, which may lead to an infection. Like all sharks, it can never be exposed to copper-based medications.
Food and diet:Feed a varied diet consisting of large chunks of meaty foods. These foods include krill, raw table shrimp, squid, clam and mussel.
Reef Compatability:No
Level of Care: Difficult
Acclimation time: 4+ hours
Approximate Purchase Size: Small: up to 6"; Medium: 6" to 8"; Large: 8" to 15"
*Special Note:Because of the increased level of care required for this species it has been marked Advance Aquarist , as an"Advanced Aquarist Species," there is no guarantee provided. 

Small $119.99 Medium $149.99 Large $199.99
Quantity :
size :
 

 Epaulette Shark
Hemiscyllium ocellatum

Description:Epaulette Shark (Hemiscyllium ocellatum) is an Australian native that adapts well to aquarium life. Initially, it may be hesitant to feed. Squid or any available Feeder Shrimp can help entice its appetite. Food soaked in preparations such as Garlic Guard have also been known to help in this process. Sharks in captivity should typically be food a few prey items a few times a week. Like all sharks the Epaulette Shark tends to be a nocturnal feeder. When provided with the proper care, the Epaulette Shark is possibly one of the best sharks to maintain for the experienced home aquarists.
Recommended Tank: 300 gallon plus aquariums. It requires sand as the substrate as the abdomen is easily scratched by a coarser substrate, which may lead to an infection. It should never be exposed to copper-based medications.
Food and diet:It is a difficult fish to acclimate and may not eat. When first introduced into the aquarium, small pieces of cleaned squid or live saltwater feeder shrimp should be used to entice this fish to eat. Then it may be fed shrimp, scallops or pieces of fresh marine fish.
Reef Compatability: No
Level of Care: Difficult
Acclimation time: 4+ hours
Approximate Purchase Size:Medium: 12" to 16"; Large: 16" to 20"
*Special Note:Because of the increased level of care required for this species it has been marked Advance Aquarist , as an"Advanced Aquarist Species," there is no guarantee provided. 

Medium $599.99 Large $699.99

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 Port Jackson Shark
Heterodontus portusjacksoni

Description:
The olive green Port Jackson shark, is also called the Bullhead or Horn Shark. The olive green body is offset by a darker green to black irregular markings throghout the body.Found in the coastal regions of southern Australia, including the waters off Port Jackson. It has a large head with prominent forehead ridges and dark brown harness-like markings on a lighter grey-brown body. This pattern makes it very easy to identify this species. Port Jackson sharks are similar to other organisms in their genus, bearing a broad, flat head, an anal fin, and crests above its eyes. However, the species possesses characteristics that make them easily identifiable—their teeth and the harness-like markings which run for a majority of their body length. The Port Jacjson has a spine at the front of both of the dorsal fins so care should be taken.The Port Jackson shark may be difficult to acclimate to an aquarium, but once acclimated has proven to be extremely hardy.
Recommended Tank: 300 gallon plus aquariums. It requires sand as the substrate as the abdomen is easily scratched by a coarser substrate, which may lead to an infection. It should never be exposed to copper-based medications.
Food and diet:It is a difficult fish to acclimate and may not eat. When first introduced into the aquarium, small pieces of cleaned squid or live saltwater feeder shrimp should be used to entice this fish to eat. Then it may be fed shrimp, scallops or pieces of fresh marine fish.
Reef Compatability: No
Level of Care: Difficult
Acclimation time: 4+ hours
Approximate Purchase Size: 10" to 16"
*Special Note:Because of the increased level of care required for this species it has been marked Advance Aquarist , as an"Advanced Aquarist Species," there is no guarantee provided. 

$749.99
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Blue Dot Stingray
Taeniura lymma

Description:The Blue Dot Stingray is also commonly referred to as the Bluespotted Ribbontail Ray and Blue Spotted Stingray. Blue Dot Stingrays stay relatively small. While rays are very exotic and interesting species, they require special housing and feeding requirements and should only be attempted by expert hobbyists or institutions. The Blue Dot Stingray is an attractive bottom dwelling species with a tan body with bright blue spots. The body is more oval in shape than many other ray species with a long tail spine. The middle of the body is more raised and flattens out towards the edges. , but is only used for protection. Caution should be taken when netting it, or when it is not visible and maintenance is performed in the aquarium. It is important to provide this species with a large aquarium with a deep sand bed, so that it can swim and turn comfortably without hitting walls or rockwork within the aquarium and can easily bury itself within the sand when not feeding. Bluespotted Stingrays species should never be exposed to copper-based medications.
Caution - Once acclimated and feeding well, the Bluespotted Stingray will eat any invertebrates or mollusks in the aquarium. Care should always be exercised when handling or working in the aquarium with this species as its tail spine is venomous
Recommended Tank: The Blue Dot Stingray requires a soft substrate, such as sand, as its abdomen is easily scratched by a coarser substrate, which could result in an infection. When not swimming along the bottom in search of food, the Blue Dot Stingray likes to cover itself with the soft substrate as camouflage.
Food and diet:When first introduced into the aquarium environment, it may be difficult to get this species to feed. The best way to encourage feeding is by offering it small pieces of cleaned squid, or freshwater ghost shrimp. Dimming the lights in the room along with live foods will help the Bluespotted Stingray to adjust to feeding within the aquarium environment. When feeding consistently, it can be fed pieces of shrimp, scallops, or fish. Keep in mind that any live crustaceans or mollusks will become food for the ray as well.
Reef Compatability: No
Level of Care: Difficult
Acclimation time: 4+ hours
Approximate Purchase Size: 9" to 11"
*Special Note:Because of the increased level of care required for this species it has been marked Advance Aquarist , as an"Advanced Aquarist Species," there is no guarantee provided. 

$249.99
Quantity :

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Photos are representative of each species. Each animal is unique and variations should be expected.
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